Dear David,


The only thing that two means is the number 2

I have two brothers named Pip and Squeak.


Too
can mean also, more than enough, or very.
After he ate the cake, he ate the pie too!
She is carrying too many elephants by herself.
The water is too cold for dipping my toes in.

To usually means towards.
He went to Antarctica and saw penguins.


“To” is sometimes used in front of verbs like:
My sister is learning how to juggle pineapples.


Here's a memory trick for these tricky words:
He: Last year I went to two schools.
She: I went to two too!


So here's the right way to word your question:


“To,” "two," and “too” are too much for me! 
Do you have one or two tips to help me keep
them straight?


I hope this helps.


Sincerely,


Professor Grammar

Here's your chance to ask Professor Grammar any question about the English language. Maybe your question and the professor's answer will be posted here someday. Go to CONTACT ME to ask your question. There's a sample question and answer below.

Dear Professor Grammar,


“To,” “two,” and “too” are to/two/too much for me! 
Do you have one or
to/two/too tips to/two/too
help me keep them straight?


Thanks a lot.


David,  age 10,  Madison, WI


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